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Store Lungegårdsvannet Walk

Table of Contents

Another week, another walk. Over the last week Bergen was blessed with some hot and sunny weather, so I took it as an opportunity to take photos of my new walk, the Lungegård Lake Walk.

This is a walk I’ve done many times on my own; the lake is close to my apartment and makes for a great place to exercise. A walking path circles the entire lake, and it’s probably one of the most popular places (excluding the mountains) for locals to exercise.

You could easily do the walk around the lake on your own. The path is easy enough to follow. However, the more times I did this walk, the more I realised there’s a lot of Bergen history and culture around the lake. And it’s worthy of a walking tour!

That’s one of the reasons I stray away from the lakeside during the walk. Another reason is that they are currently building the new Bybanen (light rail) track along one side of the lake, and it had turned into an ugly and noisy construction site. For that part of the walk we go through Kalfaret instead, but you could easily do that part of the lake – the path is still there.

This walk starts in the leafy wealthy suburb of Kalfaret; historically this has been an area for the wealthy. As you circle the lake, you’ll slowly enter Årstad, a working class area. I think this works really well and makes the walk a little bit more interesting; the wooden manor houses slowly turn into cramped apartment buildings, and the real Bergen shows itself.

This is a long walk. When I was photographing it (because I take so long taking pictures), I broke the walk up into three parts. As always, I’ve included places for detours and extensions should you want a little more. On this walk you are always close to public transport should you choose to end early. There are also plenty of benches, cafes and rest stops along the way.

I hope you enjoy this walk 🙂 I sure did!

Walking Information

  • Length: 7km / 4.3 miles
  • Time to allocate: 2-2.5 hours
  • Steepness: The steepest part is around Fløenbakken/Årstadgeilen. That is the only steep part. It’s not really ‘steep’, more a gradual incline that wares you down 😉 But most of this walk is flat.
  • Those who are interested in architecture
  • Nature lovers
  • Visitors who want to see Bergen ‘off the beaten track’

Walk Features

  • See a wide variety of Bergen’s architecture
  • Pass by our most famous leprosy hospital
  • Walk on the oldest street in Bergen
  • Wander through Bergen’s hospital complex
  • Get a true insight into what it’s like to live here
  • See the city from a different point of view

Notes:

  • Large portions of this walk go through residential areas. Please be quiet and respectful towards the locals.
  • The lake is popular with runners and cyclists, so make sure to respect the rules (keep to the right) and watch out for them!

Part 1: Kalfaret

Kalfaret is a suburb just outside the city centre of Bergen and was ‘the country’ (i.e. not part of Bergen) until 1877.

The name comes from Calvarieveien (Calvary Road) and refers to the old Catholic tradition of walking around a road that is 1200 steps in length on Good Friday. This is approximately the distance from St. Jacobs Churchyard (next to Stadsporten) up to Kalfartoppen, the highest point in Kalfaret (this is the first portion of the walk we’ll take).

Starting in the 18th century, a number of country houses were built along Kalfarveien. At the end of the 18th century, a row of Linden Trees were planted along the road, and gradually it was turned into a promenade that became a popular day trip walk with a number of restaurants and cafes along the way.

In the 19th century, wealthy citizens began to move out of the city centre due to overcrowding and had lovely villas built along the mountainside in Kalfaret. Since then, Kalfaret has been synonymous with ‘wealthy Bergen’.

Today a lot of the country houses are gone or have been significantly converted, and the large gardens have been filled with modern apartments. Still, we will be able to see some fo the old villas from the late 19th century, and there’s also great examples of the Bergen-style houses.

Since this is an upper-class suburb, most of the houses have large hedges or fences around them, making it hard to see the houses. You will be able to see most of them, but please don’t go into anyone’s property!

Now, let’s start the walk.

Start: Stadsporten

This walk begins outside Stadsporten, the old boundary marker that has been here since 1628. A little further down the road, towards Kalfaret, used to be a gate where those coming into the city had to pay a tax in consumable goods – this lasted until 1846.

Until the Nygård Bridge was completed in 1851, Stadsporten was the only southern land entrance into Bergen.

Originally Stadsporten was surrounded by walls and functioned as part of the city’s defence. The building was modelled after Muren, the little white house on Nordnes. In 1740, Stadsporten got a moat, palisades and a wind bridge. The present appearance is from 1792.

Today Stadsporten is a popular symbol for Bergen, and it is included on the newspaper Bergens Tidende‘s logo.

You will see a lot of iconography on the building. On the northern side of the building is a coat of arms – this is for the wife of Henrik Thott, who was the successor after Oluf Parsberg, who built Stadsporten.

You’ll also see the monogram of King Christian IV, the King of Denmark-Norway when Stadsporten was built.

 

The inscription reads:

“Anno 1628 on August 6, Honorable and Welcoming Man Olef Parsberg lent to the Iron, Royal Majesty’s: The Man of the Court at Bergenhus, just the First Stone for foundations and Building to this Gate, which made the Royal Majesty’s honor and this Bye and Church still alive The Gaff and the Best. God Almighty let it stand in peace and round until the day of our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Presented Domino Zabaot.”

Pass through Stadsporten and leave the city behind! On your right you'll soon see a cemetery. Enter it to find...

Ole Who?

Ole Bull was a Norwegian violinist and composer who is widely regarded as the pioneer of the Norwegian ‘National Romanticism’ movement that occurred throughout the 19th century. Ole Bull became hugely famous, especially in the Norwegian settlements in America as well as his native Norway. He is often credited with having discovered the talents of Edvard Grieg and encouraging him to pursue his studies. You can visit Ole Bull’s home, Lysøen, just south of Bergen.

Assistant's Cemetery

This cemetery was laid out in 1837 after a large cholera outbreak in the city. When the cemetery was being prepared, a whale skeleton was found from the time this land was part of the sea bed (the whale is now at the Natural History Museum – see my Sydnes walk). Before the cemetery was laid out, the locals would play baseball here on Blue Monday after the fast.

The cemetery has mainly been used for the wealthy, and many of the most famous Bergen surnames can be found here. For those not familiar with wealthy Bergensers, the most famous grave here will be Ole Bull’s. Ole Bull was a famous fiddle player from Bergen who was kind of like a major celebrity at the time. He also travelled a lot to the Norwegian settlements in the U.S. to play concerts. His grave is in the middle of the cemetery and there’s an information board next to him.

The cemetery has a lovely collection of old trees, but over the year it has had to give up half of its area to the railway just behind.

The cemetery was closed in 1919.

Leave the cemetery the way you came in - alive! All jokes aside, head back out the same gate and turn right to begin your walk along Kalfarveien.

Beautification

After the Bethany Hospital you’ll see this windy road up the mountain. This is Beautification (Forskjønnelsen in Norwegian) – a 200-year-old park that stretches all the way up to Fjellveien. Feel free to take a quick detour up here – there are lovely views from the top!

Kalfarveien

Now we are walking along the old road the Catholics would take. Historically, this road was the connection between Bergen and the eastern part of the country. It was also the old road that led from the royal manor Alrekstad (we are making our way there) to Vågen (the bay in front of Bryggen) in the centuries before the city was built.

From the late 1700s, the road had all the lime trees planted. It turned into the city’s more prominent promenade street. On a Sunday, up to 18,000 people could be strolling along this road.

There are a number of lovely villas along the street. I’ve tried to include all the ones you can see clearly. These will lead us to our next stop, the Bethany Hospital. It’s up to you how long you spend looking at them, of course!

The even-numbered buildings are on your left; the odd-numbered buildings are on your right.

Kalfarveien 2 (the bright yellow building near Stadsporten) is a A three-year upper secondary school for economic and general education subjects. Has been used as a school since 1904.

Kalfarveien 8 was Built in 1790 as a country manor. Was converted in 1840. Now it’s the Intermission Hostel.

Kalfarveien 10 was built in 1914. Was modified several times; the last time was in 1939. Now it is the building of the Christian Evangelism Organisation Nagivatørene.

Kalfarveien 14 wsas built in 1788 for merchant Hans Tank. Now it’s known as “Tanks Minde” (Tanks Memorial). The house was demolished to expand the Bethany Hospital.

The Bethany Hospital

The Bethany Hospital is located at Kalfarveien 20 – now it’s the Kalfaret Medical Centre. The Bethany Hospital was in operation from 1914 to 1991, and since then the building has been a nursing home.

The oldest part of the building was built in 1843 for county attorney Jens Schydtz. His part of the building is the part that you’ll see clearly in ruins. It’s been this way since at least 2015.

Beautification

After the Bethany Hospital you’ll see this windy road up the mountain. This is Beautification (Forskjønnelsen in Norwegian) – a 200-year-old park that stretches all the way up to Fjellveien. Feel free to take a quick detour up here – there are lovely views from the top!

Continue along Kalfarveien. Eventually you'll see a large white wooden building on your right.

Optional Detour: Seiersbjerget

Kalfarveien 32 is service housing built in 1971.

Kalfarveien 34: A Swiss-style villa built in 1872 for Albert Gran. It’s called ‘Ranhuset’ after the Ran Choir. Currently used as a venue to host parties.

Kalfarveien 35 is a business building. Established in the former 200-year-old stable building that belonged to Villa Sofienlund (next door)

Leprosy in Bergen

Bergen was famous in Northern Europe as the international centre for leprosy research. The main reason was that Bergen had higher numbers of leprosy patients than other parts of Europe, and therefore doctors and researchers came to the city to study the disease. One of the reasons Bergen had so many cases of leprosy was that the city was incredibly densely populated and the people had very poor hygiene. If you want to learn more about leprosy, you can visit the leprosy hospital!

The Leprosy Hospital

On your right, you’ll soon see a large white building. This is the Leprosy Nursing Home (Pleiestiftelsen for spedalske), built in 1857 to treat leprosy patients. It served as a partial replacement for the nearby St. Jørgen’s Hospital, the city’s first leprosy hospital from around 1400. This hospital had 44 patient rooms with a total of 280 patients.

The building has a base area of 1750m2 and a total area of 7235m2, making it the country’s largest building in wood. By comparison, the wooden royal place in Trondheim, Stiftsgården, has an area of 1150m2.

This is the hospital where Gerhard Armauer Hansen (1841-1912) was hired as a physician and went on to make the research effort that led to the detection of the leprosy bacteria in 1873; since then, leprosy has been known as Hansen’s Disease.

The Nursing Foundation, the world’s first medical personal register, was created here in 1856. Hansen used this register to discover that leprosy was not hereditary but contagious.

The number of patients declined rapidly throughout the 20th century. In 1955, there were only 7 left. The State Accreditation Institute (later the National Labour Market Institute) took over the building in 1956. Since 2001, the state-owned real estate company Entra Eiendom AS has been the owner of the building.

On the outside you’ll see a memorial plaque (top left picture) for Daniel Cornelius Danielsson (1815-1894), who is the colleague and father-in-law of Armauer Hansen. 

Continue along Kalfarveien

Kalfarveien 32 is service housing built in 1971.

Kalfarveien 34: A Swiss-style villa built in 1872 for Albert Gran. It’s called ‘Ranhuset’ after the Ran Choir. Currently used as a venue to host parties.

Kalfarveien 35 is a business building. Established in the former 200-year-old stable building that belonged to Villa Sofienlund (next door)

Villa Sofienlund (Kalfarveien 37)

Villa Sofienlund is a good example of the old Kalfaret villas. It was built for F.G. Gade in 1868. The building is known as ‘Legenes Hus’ (Doctors House) today and is a venue for parties.

Optional Detour: Seiersbjerget

After Kalfarveien 37 you’ll see a road on your right called Seiersbjerget. The name comes from a smelting mine that operated here during the 1700s, where they mined for copper and pyrite. The villas here were built up around the early 20th century.

Number 13 is one of Bergen’s most expensive houses; selling for 20 million NOK in 208.

Number 17 was built in 1898 for ship-owner and later Prime Minister, Johan Ludwig Mowinckel. It is built in the Bergen style.

Note – the street is cut in two; if you want to see Number 13, take the first Seiersbjerget on your right. If you want to see Number 17, take the second Seiersbjerget on your right. The second path is a little further down the road, and you’ll need to backtrack to come back to our walk. You can’t walk between the two. Also note this is a very private street – you can walk down it, but be respectful towards the owners.

Continue along Kalfarveien

Kalfarveien 54

Kalfarveien 54 is a typical Swiss-style villa built in 1873 for merchant Hans Gran. Was restored in 1923, saved from demolition in 1969, and then restored again in the early 1990s.

Continue along Kalfarveien until you reach the part of the road where it splits in two. This is...

Punktum

This is the highest point on Kalfarveien, and where many people chose to end their walk from the city. To the right used to be Store Kalfaret, a large country estate that in the mid-1800s served food, beer and spirits in a pub. The pub burned down in 1868 and the property was purchased by Christian Sundt, the wealthiest man in Bergen. He converted it into a lovely residence and lived there until his death in 1901. Today it is the Barnhage (Kindergarten) you see on your right.

The road that leads uphill is Kalvedalsveien (Calf Valley), named after the gazing calves that used to be here. It used to be a very steep area (with a gradient of 1:4), but the worst climbs were blasted away in the mid-19th century. There are many lovely houses along the road, but by now you may be ‘housed out’. If you want to see more of the houses, follow my optional walk. If not, jump down to Part 2: The Royal Estate.

Optional Detour: Show Me the Houses!

If you want to see even more lovely Bergen villas, this is a short loop you can do up the side of the hill. You can extend it yourself by walking along extra roads. You will see them marked on the map. Here is an overview of the houses. 

Head up Kalvedalsveien and then take a left just after the bus stop onto the road Kalfarlien. Along this road you’ll see some of the city’s most interesting villas from the early 1900s. Here they are:

Kalfarvien 1: Built in 1909 for Aldoph von Tangen-Jorden. The split roof is typical of houses from the 1700s.

Kalfarlien 3: Classist villa built for Knud G. Fleischer in 1854. Has a cast iron verandah.

 

Kalfarlien 4: Has lovely Rococo details on the exterior. Was built in 1912.

Kalfarlien 5: Inspired by classic Bergen architecture

Kalfarlien 7, 8, 9: Inspired by Viennese Youth Architecture

Kalfarlien 18: Built in 1910 in an art nouveau style. It was for sale recently and the interior was a complete renovator.

Once you're finished with Kalfarlien, head up to Øvre Kalfarlien (the road is just after Kalfarlien 5). Follow it as it curves around to the right. Continue along the road.

Øvre Kalfarlien 22 is a Classist villa from 1910

Øvre Kalfarlien 27 is a Classicist villa also from 1910

Øvre Kalfarlien was built in 1977

Eventually on the left you'll see this large, stone house.

Øvre Kalfarlien 42

This house was built between 1915-1917 for Professor Haakon Shetelig. It is an example of the ‘Bergen School’, which emphasises good craftsmanship, use of local materials, and blending the house into the landscape. The house is influenced by the building traditions of Western Norway, though it does also have Renaissance and English vibes.

Continue straight. The road will get narrow and you'll see it goes downhill. It may look like a private road, but we follow it. We end up on Gamle Kalvedalsvei. Turn right and follow the road as it curves downhill. You'll end up back where you started. From here, you can keep exploring the area, or rejoin with the main tour.

Part Two: The Royal Estate

Now it’s time to make our way down to the lake. Starting from Punktum, instead of going left for the optional walk, we go right and continue down Kalfarveien.

Kalfvarveien 45 (the yellow house) – is the old Store Kalfaret

Kalfarveien 57A

Built in 1926 as the office building for the Hansa Brewery (you’ll see the Hanseatic logo above the door). Built in a Baroque style. Today it is the Danish Consulate. 

The Hansa Brewery

This building was the original location of the Hansa Brewery.

The Hansa Brewery is the local brewery of Bergen. It was established in 1891 by Waldemar Stoud Platou when he acquired the minor brewery Det Sembske Bryggeri. The name “Hansa’ reflects Bergen’s history as one of the most important Hansa trading cities.

In 2012 the brewery moved out of Kalfaret and to Kokstad, close to the airport.

Continue along Kalfarveien. The next building on your left is Høyskolen Christiania, a private university with Bachelor and Master degrees. On your right, you'll pass a very modern looking apartment building (see photo below), and then straight ahead will be a pale timber house with two towers. That's our next stop.

Kalfarveien 77

Kalfarveien 77 is a villa that was built in 1869 as the summer residence for businessman Peter Jebsen, who founded Dale of Norway. Operated as an old age home until 1983. The property was purchased by the Bergen Deaf Association in 1984 and the ornaments were taken over by Gamle Bergen. Today it’s used as a daycare centre and as the Deaf Centre.

Just behind the building, to the right in the image, is the church for the deaf.

Continue along Kalfarveien

Kalfarveien 83

This is Anna Jebsen’s Minde. It was founded in 1866 by Anna Jebsen, who was the wife of Peter Jebsen. Anna founded it as a private orphanage under the name Pleiestiftelse for smaabørn. The orphanage moved to this site in 1924 after the building was finished. It was a private foundation until 1981, when it was taken over by the county and moved out to Bønes (a suburb on the outskirts of Bergen). The building is still owned by the foundation and is today a child welfare institution (emergency room for youth) with room for 10 young people.

Eventually you’ll reach a bridge overhead. This is part of the new train bridge that’s being built to the train station. This is also the area where they are building the new Bybanen (light rail) track. So, there’s quite a bit of construction going on. It may seem confusing to find where we are going. Here’s what we do: 1) As you approach the bridge, you’ll see a bright red sign saying “Møllendalsvg”. Follow the sign as it leads you under the bridge. 2) Once you’re on the other side, you’ll see two yellow signs pointing in two different directions. We take the one to the left - the one saying “Sentrum via Fløenbakken”. 3) It will lead you past a modern apartment building on your left. Once you see that building, you know you’ve made it. 4) Follow the road until you get to an intersection with a small road on your left. It is hard to spot - it has a red circular ‘no entry’ sign, and there’s a small garage on the street corner. That street is Årstadgeilen. We take this road.

Årstadgeilen

Årstadgeilen is believed to be the oldest road in Bergen. It marked the path from the lake, where the kings would leave their boats, up to their royal estate, Alrekstad. The ancient landscape will begin to reveal itself as we walk up Årstadgeilen; we are walking up on the edge of an ancient moraine, making our way to its plateau.

Up until recently Årstadgeilen was part of the farm property, but over the years land has been sold off and houses have been built along here. The stone walls indicate older times, and the stone came from the old Årstad Church.

Årstad is the name of the borough (it derives from the Royal Estate name Alrekstad), and geilen means “steep ascent”. That’s what we are going to do. This is the only uphill part of our walk! Feel free to stop and relax a little bit. Take a look at the lovely houses.

Make your way to the top of Årstadgeilen. You’ll know you’re at the top when it begins to flatten out and there’s a large white building directly in front of you. You've made it to...

Alrekstad Royal Estate

Alrekstad was one of the largest “Kongsgård” (Royal estates) on the west coast of Norway during the early Middle Ages. It is also the oldest of the Kongsgård in Norwegian history. ‘Alrekstadir’, as it is mentioned in the Viking sagas, derives from the name of the mountain it sits against, Ulriken (it’s the mountain with the TV tower we’ve been seeing this whole time). Alrekstadir was established as a manor and royal residence for the early Kings of Norway. The first King to use it was King Harald Fairhair (Harald Hårfagre, 872-930), who united Norway under one kingom. Snorre Sturlason, who wrote the Sagas about the Norwegian kings, says that Alrekstadir was among five farms where Harald Fairhair lived.

Alrekstadir was the site where, in 1070, King Olav Kyrre looked out over the bay and decided to found Bergen as a city. He finalised his new city with the construction of the Christ Church on the site where the Bergen Fortress is today. Olav Kyrre ruled Norway for 26 years from Alrekstadir.

The royal estate lost its importance when King Øystein I (1103-1123) moved the royal estate to the Bergen Fortress, then called Holmen. This was mostly for strategic reasons; it made sense to be closer to the water and the bay, where residents were trading. Alrekstad was simply too far away. Also, the fjord entrance (now Store Lungegårdsvannet) was considered dangerous due to its strong currents.

In 1277, King Magnus the Lawmender gave Alrekstad to the Nonnester Monastery. From 1494 onwards, Nonnester Monastery stood empty; in 1495 the land was actually used as a shooting range for merchants! In 1507, the site was taken over by the Antonius brothers, who were engaged in nursing and hospitality. In 1528, King Frederik I donated the monastery and any associated properties to Vincens Lunge, who tore it down and built his own private residence. He also renamed the lake from “Alrekstadsvannet” to “Lungegårdsvannet”, after himself.

The estate remained as a farm and major landowner until the 18th century, when eventually pieces of the property were sold off to built industrial plants or smaller farmsteads. It lost most of its size in the 19th century, when more housing was required and the area, Årstad, was incorporated into the city of Bergen. The city expansion of 1915 saw the remaining pockets of land sold off to make way for University and Hospital buildings, which will be the next lot of buildings we’ll see on this walk.

Continue past Alrekstad Royal Estate, now the Alrekstad School, and you'll soon be walking on concrete blocks. Take a close look on them and you'll see dates and images tracing the history of this site. At the end of the concrete blocks, there are some information boards that tell more about the history of Alrekstad.

Part Three: The Hospital Area of Bergen

For the next part of the walk we are going to make our way through the modern hospital area. Lets start with that very modern building next to Alrekstad. 

School of Denistry

Next to Alrekstad, to your left as you walk towards the information boards, is the School of Denistry.

This building is part of the University of Bergen, and is where you go if you are studying clinical dentistry. From their website:

The dental study is varied with training in biological, medical and dentistry subjects, as well as practical training. The bachelor’s program in dental care is intended to educate students on health-promoting and disease-prevention work.

At the Odontological University Clinic, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease and injuries to teeth, oral cavity and jaws are performed.

The institute’s research environment is of high international standard and carries out research education and specialist education in dentistry.

https://www.uib.no/odontologi

Continue straight towards the main road, Årstadveien. Across the street you'll see the Haukeland School. There's no need to cross the street to get closer, and here's a quick overview of the school.

Haukeland School

Haukeland School is the oldest school in Årstad, opening 1832. It was built on the site of what is believed to be the original Alrekstad Royal Estate. For a long time, Haukeland School was actually known as Årstad School.

Originally the school was located in small houses rented from nearby mills. There was one classroom and accommodation for the teacher. It took 14 years before the school finally got its own building. Back then, it was tough for the students. They’d have to walk several kilometres to school from their homes in Solheim, Kronstad and Landås no matter the weather.

Haukland School has been expanded many times, and the most recent building is from 1975.

Turn right and continue walking along Årstadveien.

Haraldsplass

Haraldsplass is a local hospital for Bergen. It is a fairly modern hospital; while it was established in 1918 the most recent renovation was completed in 2018. It has departments in internal medicine surgery, anaesthesiology, monitoring and radiology. There is a total of 183 beds and 925 employees at the hospital.

Continue walking along Årstadveien.

The Old Cemetery

The cemetery you are passing was established in 1866 after the cemetery in the city centre became too small. It was further expanded in 1887 and then again in 1907. When the cemetery became full once again in 1912, the old burial ground was re-used. The cemetery was closed in 1964. There are some known people buried here, including the old parish priest for Årstad, Grønvold, as well as the Meyer family, who owned Årstad Farm.

 

The modern apartment buildings behind the cemetery are a retirement home, as is the red circular building.

Continue walking along Årstadveien. By now, you’ve probably noticed that huge building we are walking towards with all the cranes. Lets get to know the...

Haukeland University Hospital

The Haukeland University Hospital is the main hospital in Western Norway and the largest hospital in Norway in terms of number of patients with about 600,000 treated each year. It is about 200,000m2 (2,200,000 sq ft) big. The hospital has a cooperation with the University of Bergen and is also the largest employer in Bergen with approximately 11,800 employees. Haukeland University Hospital is a national special hospital and resource centre for burn injuries, air-pressure injuries (diving), cornea-protesises and treatment of intercranial tumours. There is an extensive research environment at the hospital and the hospital’s specialists provide advice to doctors throughout the country and teach at the universities.

The hospital was established in 1912 after the current hospital, located in Sydnes (see my walking guide!) was too small and outdated. It was established particularly to fight against infections, and in the opening year the Epidemic Department treated a total of 1012 diphtheria patients. The hospital has been continuously expanded over the years and is now spread out throughout the borough Årstad.

Just before the car tunnel you will notice the pedestrian path curves to the right to walk alongside the tunnel. Take that path. It is marked by a bike sign pointing to “Årstad Kirke”. You will then reach Jonas Lie vei. Turn right and walk along that road. The first concrete building on our lefthand side will be the hospital building from the last major expansion in the 1970s/1980s, and then the next building on the left will be the old building.

Haukeland Old Building

This is the back of the old hospital building from 1912. When I walked past it in 2020, all I saw was a half construction project. Sadly it looks like they’ve torn out some parts of the old hospital building. If you want to see the front of the building, it’s possible to take a quick detour to go to the front.

The old building is used as the Rheumatology Department, the Nervous Clinic, the National Competence Service for Multiple Sclerosis and the National Competence Service for Sleep Diseases.

Just before the car tunnel you will notice the pedestrian path curves to the right to walk alongside the tunnel. Take that path. It is marked by a bike sign pointing to “Årstad Kirke”. You will then reach Jonas Lie vei. Turn right and walk along that road. The first concrete building on our lefthand side will be the hospital building from the last major expansion in the 1970s/1980s, and then the next building on the left will be the old building.

Optional Detour: Commonwealth War Graves

The cemetery we are currently passing is the Møllendal Cemetery, which I’ll talk about soon. For now, though, it is possible to take a quick detour into the cemetery to see the Commonwealth War Graves. We’ll be too far down to circle back here later.

To get there, take the next available entrance into the cemetery. There should be a gate on your right shortly after the old hospital building. You’ll be able to see the war graves as you walk along Jonas Lie Vei as the graves are surrounded by a small hedge fence. Once in the cemetery, follow the path to the next right turn and you’ll be at the war graves.

The Commonwealth War Graves are 46 graves from soldiers who fought in Norway during World War II. There is a sign in front of the graves that outlines why and where they fought in Norway during the war. In general, the Commonwealth forces fought hard to keep Norway independent from German forces. They also carried out raids and dropped supplies into Norway. The Norwegian King, Haakon VII, and the government were in London throughout the war. In total, 988 Commonwealth servicemen died in Norway during World War II and can be found in 65 cemeteries throughout the country. 160 of the burials are Navy, 343 are Army, 450 are Air Force, and 35 are Merchant Navy. There are 905 British, 50 Canadian, 24 Australian, 11 New Zealand, 1 South African and 1 Norwegian.

Continue along Jonas Lie Vei

Årstad Church

The borough we are in, Årstad, likely had a church as far back as the Middle Ages. It was located about 600m (2,000ft) north of this church and was known as the Church of the Holy Cross. The church probably decayed after the Reformation in 1536 and was disassembled after the great fire of 1702 so the stones could be used to repair the buildings in the city centre of Bergen, including the Bergen Cathedral. By 1736, the church was gone. By that point, the locals were using the nearby Birkeland Church (located at Nestun, about 7km/4 mi away) anyway.

The new Årstad Church was built in 1890. The Årstad Church was built in a New Gothic style in soapstone and has seating for 700 people. The stained-glass windows have scenes from Jesus’ life and were probably made in England. They were donated to the church by factory owner JC Meyer.

Årstad Church is not open to the public.

Optional Detour: Kronstad Manor

From here you have the option to walk a little further along the road to reach one of the most famous “Hovedgård” (estate) buildings in Bergen: Kronstad.

To get there, keep walking along Jonas Lie Vei until you reach this intersection that curves off to the right. If you look across the street, you’ll see there’s a small road that leads off on its own path from Jonas Lie Vei. That is Kronstadveien. If you follow that road for 260m (0.2 mi), you’ll be at Kronstad Manor.

The land Kronstad Manor is on used to be part of the Alrekstad Royal Estate, but it was not farmed until the Nonneseter Monastery took over the property. Kronstad (or Hunsstadir as it was known back then) was part of the large land that Vincens Lunge acquired when he came to Bergen in the 1520s, and he lived at the property on the site. In the mid-1600s, the Lunge family sold off the land.

Between 1685-1693 the manor belonged to Jørgen Thormøhlen (of Møhlenpris – see my Sydnes walk!), and then in 1705 it was owned by Anders Bruun, the vicar of Bergen Cathedral, who renamed it Cronstad. Christian Gerhard Ameln (1809-1872), a merchant, purchased it in 1781, constructing several new buildings and clearing the field. He also rebuilt the manor house as a one-floor building. Joachim Friele (1793-1881) was the next owner. He was a merchant and wine importer and bought Kronstad in 1840. He had it rebuilt, taking inspiration from the French Chateau Margaux. However, it also has similarities to Austad Hovedgård in Drammen and Gjemsø Monastery. When it was finished, it was one of the largest private mansions in the district. The property changed hands several more times and was then listed for protection in 1927.

Kronstad Manor is today characterised by its Empire-style architecture and is regarded as one of the finest examples in Bergen. It is owned by a private foundation (Active War Participants Association) and is rented out for various uses – my sister in law had her wedding reception there! It is occasionally open to the public for tours during the summer. In addition to the main building, there’s a janitor’s residence, outbuildings and a garden house. There are several lovely beech and lime trees on the property.

When you’re ready, return to Årstad Church.

To get to the cemetery, from Jonas Lie Vei we take a right onto Klaus Hanssens Vei. The next road on your right will also be called Klaus Hanssens Vei. Take that road, which will narrow into a path, and you'll be at Møllendal Cemetery.

Møllendal Cemetery

The Møllendal Cemetery was established in the mid-19th century after the cemeteries in the city centre were filling up. Originally the property had belonged to the Øvre Møllendal farm, but it had already been purchased by the municipality to secure the water rights to the nearby Svartdikevannet.

Today Møllendal Cemetery is the largest cemetery in Bergen and is still in use. There are several chapels in the cemetery, including the Møllendal Lille Kapell, which we’ll soon see. First though, we need to learn where the name Møllendal comes from.

Continue down the path until you reach the first right intersection. Follow that path. Follow it all the way until it curves left, and then take another left. You'll be on Møllendalsveien and there will be some big trees to your right. Look between the trees to see the beginning of the next part of our walk, the River & the Lake

Part Four: The River & the Lake

Møllendal River

The Møllendal River runs for about 7.5km from Svartdiket (a large lake nestled between Fløyen and Ulriken) to Store Lungegårdsvannet (the large lake we are about to walk along). The river has been used for hydropower since ancient times. In 1614 there were three mill sites along the river; two of the mills were used as German grain mills, and the third was a bark mill that is still standing at Møllendalsbakken 1. It’s a little later in our walk.

The river was characterised by the number of mills operating along it, and over time there have been, besides grain & bark mills, sawmills, stamp mills, flour mills, and copper mills. The mills were more or less gone by 1899 when development increased around the area.

Run left and walk alongside the river. On your right will soon be the Møllendal Chapel.

Møllendal Chapel

The Møllendal River runs for about 7.5km from Svartdiket (a large lake nestled between Fløyen and Ulriken) to Store Lungegårdsvannet (the large lake we are about to walk along). The river has been used for hydropower since ancient times. In 1614 there were three mill sites along the river; two of the mills were used as German grain mills, and the third was a bark mill that is still standing at Møllendalsbakken 1. It’s a little later in our walk.

The river was characterised by the number of mills operating along it, and over time there have been, besides grain & bark mills, sawmills, stamp mills, flour mills, and copper mills. The mills were more or less gone by 1899 when development increased around the area.

Turn right at the next road after the chapel. It will lead you out of the cemetery. You’ll be on the road Møllendalsveien, which is the main road that runs through Møllendal. Before turning right, take a look at the very modern apartment buildings to your left.

Bergen Byarkiv has a great article and photos about the history of Grønneviksøren. Here it is: https://www.bergenbyarkiv.no/aarstad/archives/raedslene-pa-gronneviksoren-husvillebrakkene/5496

Grønneviksøren Student Accommodation

The modern apartment buildings on the left-hand side are contemporary student accommodation. Before they were constructed, this location was the site of “Grønneviksøren”, or temporary housing built in 1920 for those who lost their homes in the 1916 fire. The barracks, six in total, were placed on each side of the river due to the easy access to water and sewerage. They were built in the cheapest possible way, on piles and with cardboard insulation. The barracks contained a total of 68 one-room apartments. Shared toilets and washrooms were in a separate building.

The city soon realised that these barracks were not suirbable for living. In winter there was no sun here, which made the cold and humidity extra noticeable. In summer, flies were common and the ground turned muddy from the rain. Apartments were around 25m2 and it was common that 10-12 residents would live in one apartment. The moisture destroyed furniture and fixtures, and some apartments had problems with mildew and moths.

Worst of all was the health effects it had on the people living there. In 1920, three years after the barracks were finished, 11 deaths had been reported, seven of which were children. The newspaper Arbeidet published a headline story that year: “The Horrors of Grønneviksøren”, which ends with the line “Save the 56 families from annihilation!”

New barracks, the Husville barracks, were built nearby. They weren’t much better, but the residents were glad they weren’t the Grønneviksøren barracks.

The Grønneviksøren barracks were demolished in 1939 to construct a manufactory. The current Student apartments are called Grønneviksøren after the barracks. 

Cross Møllendalsveien at the first pedestrian crossing, then turn right and keep following the road. Eventually it will come to an intersection and there will be a Bunnpris (grocery store) directly in front of you. Turn left. Keep walking down the road (stay on this side) and you’ll reach a bakery/cafe on your left.

Hyssingen Cafe & Bakery

This bakery is connected to the school that stands behind it, and they have a unique form of studies. You’ll see a sign outside the bakery. Here’s what it says:

Hyssingen is the first and so far the only production school in Norway. We are an offer for youth between the ages of 16 and 21 who for various reasons have dropped out of regular high school.

With us, the young people have the opportunity to learn in a different way. They encounter a pedagogy that is based on practitioner work – by doing real work and using their practical, creative, or technical ability to produce something that others can benefit from.

We want to give our young people professional insight, dusting and self-esteem so that they can make good choices and create a secure future for themselves.

Our cafe is open during the day and our goal is to serve our local environment’s fresh baked goods and a good lunch.

Continue to the end of Møllendalsveien, which will eventually end and turn into a pedestrian area (just past the Joker kiosk). To your right will be a large modern building.

University of Bergen Arts Building

The KMD (Kunst, Musikk, Design or Art, Music, Design) building is part of the University of Bergen and is a leading academic environment in researched-based education in the fields of art, music and design. The faculty has around 600 students and 130 employees. They offer Bachelor, Masters and PhDs in various arts courses, including fine art (with focuses in photography, print-making, ceramics, clay, painting & drawing, new media, performance-based, sculptures & textiles), music (at the Grieg Academy in classical music, jazz, composition and traditional music) and design (Bachelors & Masters with specialisation in furniture, interior design, architecture & visual communication).

Continue down to the waterfront, where we have finally made it to the main star in this walk, Store Lungegårdsvannet, or the Large Lungegård Lake.

Store Lungegårdsvannet

Store Lungegårdsvannet, or the Large Lungegård Lake, is the large lake in the middle of Bergen CBD. Originally, it was part of the Puddefjord, which runs along Sydnes. There are two Lungegård lakes in Bergen – Store and Lille. Lille Lungegårdsvannet is the small lake in the city park close to the art galleries. Both lakes, up until fairly recently, were connected.

Originally, as we know, the lake was called Alrekstadsvannet after the royal estate that sat at its end. The fjord and lake were not important as a harbour for the royal estate; the current was considered strong and dangerous and the lake froze over in the winter. Additionally, it wasn’t possible for larger ships to come in. These were some of the factors in moving the royal estate from Alrekstad to Holmen, the Bergen Fortress.  The area around the lake, including Alrekstad, was given to the Nonnester Monastery and eventually to Vincens Lunge, who renamed everything after himself.

The two lakes were separated in 1926 in order to build up the railway station area. The lake has shrunk considerably over time as more land has been needed for construction. From the 1930s onwards, the bay was no longer seen as the pleasure place that the 19th century had viewed it, but rather it had a lot of free, unused land ready for use. The lake was filled in repeatedly. The two lakes now have 700 metres (2,300 feet) of land between them. Now they are building the Bybanen (light rail) tracks close to the lake, and there are plans to build a new park on reclaimed land. This massive rehabilitation is to make the park more attractive and make it “greener”, perhaps to disguise the highways, bus terminal and train station that all sit along the lake. If you choose to circle the entire lake, you’ll see this messy construction. We saw some of it crossing under the new bridge.

Looking out to the lake (like in the photo) turn left and you’ll see the pedestrian path surrounded by trees. That’s the path we are going to take. When you see the helicopter sign, we’ve made it to our next stop.

Bergen Air Ambulance

This is the main runway for the Norwegian air ambulance. It was established in 1988 and is manned by anaesthesiologists from the Haukeland University Hospital, a pilot and a rescuer from the operating company. There are emergency vehicles here too. There have been plans in place for a new permanent landing area, but it seems like, for how, the helicopter is still here!

Continue along the pedestrian path. You’ll pass the Møllendal River for one more time on your left-hand side. Shortly, on our right, we’ll pass a marina.

Neptune Motor Boat Association

This is the main runway for the Norwegian air ambulance. It was established in 1988 and is manned by anaesthesiologists from the Haukeland University Hospital, a pilot and a rescuer from the operating company. There are emergency vehicles here too. There have been plans in place for a new permanent landing area, but it seems like, for how, the helicopter is still here!

Continue along the pedestrian path (cross back over the street to where we were before).The lake will disappear (temporarily) and the road will get busier, but stick with it. Shortly, on your left, will be a lovely mural of a Viking woman and the northern lights.

Villa Fredheim

Villa Fredheim was built as a home for the merchant and shipowner Harald Irgens (1830-1915), who lived here in the late 19th century. When he lived here, this was the rural countryside. In front of the house wasn’t a garage but a large garden that led down to the waterfront and a private jetty. There was barely any settlement around. It must’ve been lovely!

 

After Harald passed away, the house got new owners and underwent changes. The municipality bought the house in 1921 as part of its efforts to secure ownership of the shoreline along the lake. By that time, the house had been subdivided into three apartments. Between 1937 and 1982, it was a nursing home with approximately 30 patients. Since 2004 it has been a day-care. It’s not a day-care anymore; an article from 2018 says that it’s going to be converted into 8(!) apartments. 

 

It’s such a shame to see it hidden like this, but it’s a great example of the massive development that took place along this part of the lake in the early to mid 20th century. Fortunately, the exterior of the home has undergone very few changes. The stairs that we took up to the house is actually part of the old alley that would’ve gone down to the private jetty.

Continue along the pedestrian path (cross back over the street to where we were before).The lake will disappear (temporarily) and the road will get busier, but stick with it. Shortly, on your left, will be a lovely mural of a Viking woman and the northern lights.

The path will reach a traffic intersection with lights and the Bybanen rail. We turn right here - not crossing anything. Now we are going to cross the Nygård Bridge.

Nygård Bridge

The Nygård Bridge has been built over the stream that connects the Lungegård Lake with the Puddefjord. The idea of a bridge was first mentioned in the 1790s, but in true Bergen fashion it took 60 years before the plans were realised. The bridge was proposed by Michael Krohn, who wanted to link the cathedral with Årstad. But he also had personal interests in building the bridge; he wanted to build a mechanical workshop in Solheimsviken and didn’t want to have to boat across. When the bridge was completed in 1851, it had a toll charge for both driving and walk. On the first day, 4,300 people crossed the bridge – despite the rain! Before the bridge was built, those in Årstad would have to either take a boat or walk all the way around Møllendal and Kalfaret (the way we went).

The old Vossebanen (Bergen-Voss Train) train line used to run parallel to the bridge. It was built in 1882 but demolished in 1917. The pillars still stand in the water, and one can be seen above the surface.

The bridge was strengthened in 1919 for the tram line that terminated at the now closed Solheimsviken Railway Station (it was somewhere close to where we are standing). A new, second bridge with a raised section was built in 1938 so high-mast boats could pass. It was there until 1960 before being replaced with a three-lane roadway bridge that was built in 1968. In 1978, a new bridge was constructed next to the three-lane bridge. A third bridge, New Nygård Bridge II, opened in 2008. It sounds a little confusing, and I’ve never said bridge so many times in one go, but you’ll be able to clearly see three bridges as you walk across it. The Bybanen crosses the oldest bridge. Then there’s a small road bridge behind it – that’s the 1960s bridge. The two upper bridges are the 1970s and 2008 bridges.

We are going to cross the part of the bridge that Bybanen crosses (the oldest part). Halfway across the bridge you'll see the tramstop "Florida"

Florida, Norway?

Yes, welcome to Florida, Norway! The name is that of the north-western shore of the Lungegård Lake. It was originally the name of a property that stood here. The property was listed in 1753 by Johan Fredrik Fosswinckel and prospects from 1830 show it as a one-storey building with a rococo portal entrance. Over time, the property was owned by wealthy Bergen families, and eventually it was replaced with the current Geophysical Institute.

The name is a bit of a mystery. One theory is that restauranteurs in the area had given the name Florida to make it sound more appealing. Another theory is that German craftsmen were on their way to Florida in the US when they were stranded here and decided to name the area Florida.

Continue along the pedestrian path, which will eventually curve right. You will see paths that lead off to Nygårds Park, a popular walking area for locals (and a main part of my Sydnes walk), but we are going to keep following the lake. Eventually we’ll get to this small beach area. You’ll clearly be able to see I took the rest of the photos on a separate day, when Bergen was having more normal cloudy weather.

St. Paul Gymnas

St. Paul Gymnas is a Catholic upper secondary (vidergående) school that was established in 2012. It is in the former Florida Hospital, later named St. Francis Hospital, that was built in 1937. The school is (as of writing) the only Catholic high school in Norway and it enrols students from across the country. Catholics have preferential rights, but the school is open to all students. The school is financially supported by the state and the Catholic Church, but students do have to pay a deductible in the form of school fees – this is the rule for private schools in Norway.

The school offers special education programs in sports, science, language, social studies and economics. Christianity is a compulsory subject. As a compulsory second foreign language, students can choose French, Spanish, German or Italian. Elective programs include various sciences, IT, English, history and philosophy, Latin, politics and human rights, psychology, and this is the only school in the country to offer a course in church music. The school offers its own university line, where students can take a university subject in collaboration with the University of Bergen. Students who take this are also offered a three week study break at Augustana University in South Dakota.

Continue along the pedestrian path. We’ll go under the Nygård Bridge and start getting some lovely views out to Mt. Ulriken, the largest mountain in Bergen city, as well as some interesting artworks.

Australian WWII Memorial

This is a memorial for the 463. Squadron of the Royal Australian Airforce. It lists six men from Australia and the UK, all aged in their early 20s, who fought alongside Norway against the Germans in World War II. They died near this spot on the 29th of October 1944.

The attack they were apart of was in connection with the German U-boat pen at Laksevåg. On the night of the 29th of October, 237 Lancaster bombers arrived in Bergen to attack the bunker and yard. This group of men was in the first wave of attacks. The sky was so illuminated by light bombs that they couldn’t drop their bombs. As the Lancaster was retreated to Askøy to join the queue for the next round of attacks, they were attacked by the Germans and suffered multiple hits. As an effort to not crash, they released the bombs they were carrying. Of the 12 bombs, 10 hit the old theatre area at Nøstegaten. Some of the bombs exploded and created firebombs. The plane went down anyway and the men were killed.

Source: https://www.bt.no/nyheter/lokalt/i/jv3oz/ett-eneste-fly-var-nok

Continue along the pedestrian path. We’ll go under the Nygård Bridge and start getting some lovely views out to Mt. Ulriken, the largest mountain in Bergen city, as well as some interesting artworks.

Bergen Fire Station

This is the main building for the Bergen fire department. This new building opened in 2007; before then, the fire station used to be further into the city centre. In addition, there are five other stations: Åsane fire station , Arna fire station , Fana fire station , Laksevåg fire station and Sandviken fire station . Leif Linde took over as Fire Chief from 2017. Bergen Fire Department celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2013.

Cross the red bridge in front of you.

Amalie Skram VGS & AdO Arena

The large modern blue building next to the fire station is the Amalie Skram Videregående (upper secondary) school and the Alexander Dale Oen Swimming Area.

The Amalie Skram VGS was founded in 2014 and is named after the famous Bergen author Amalie Skram (1846-1905). The school has been among the most popular in Bergen since it started in 2019. The school offers optional subjects in advanced mathematics, biology, physics, chemistry, geophysics, IT, entrepreneurship, history and philosophy, English, social studies, Russian, marketing and management, Economics, broadcasting, Japanese, Chinese and more. As a mandatory second foreign language, French, Chinese, Spanish and German are offered. The school is also highly regarded for its sports programs, particularly swimming. All students have the chance to spend a school year abroad at St. Davids RC High School just outside Edinburgh, Scotland.

The Alexander Dale Oen Arena is a centre for swimming and diving. The arena is named after Alexander Dale Oen, who was Norway’s first Olympic medallist in swimming, when he won a silver during the Beijing Olympics in 2008. He died of cardiac arrest at a gathering in Flagstaff, Arizona, at the age of 26. Inside the facility are multiple pools, training pools, kids’ pools, a hot tub, and two water slides.

Optional Detour: The Whole Lake

From here you have the option to keep walking along the path and see the whole lake. It’s a lovely walk that I’d definitely recommend; just keep in mind that there aren’t many ‘exit points’ due to the construction. The closest ‘exit’ is back at Møllendal. Otherwise, follow the walk below to get back to the city. 

Just over the red bridge you’ll see a yellow sign saying “Sentrum” with an arrow. Follow that road to the left. You’ll walk along the Amalie Skram School on your right, and the Bergen Fire Station on your left. Once on the other side of the building, turn right and follow the road until it ends, where you’ll turn left. Note - there is a lot of construction work here and they’ve fenced off most of the area. It will actually make it easier for you as there’s only really one logical path you can take. Keep walking straight towards this massive ugly building. That’s the Bergen Bus Terminal.

Bergen Bus Terminal/Storsenter

Bergen Bus Terminal is the main bus hub for Bergen city and the county of Vestlandet. It is connected to Bergen Storsenter, which is the largest shopping mall in Bergen city centre. At the back of the buildings is the city’s largest parking garage.  Both buildings opened in 1988, though the Bergen Bus Terminal was established in 1958. It has been built over reclaimed land from the lake, and before the land was reclaimed this was an active boat traffic area. The buildings underwent their last major renovation in 2010, the same time the Bybanen was constructed to go through the terminal. The Bergen Storsenter is currently owned by the Olav Thon Group.

Image source: Wikipedia

You’ll be walking along this road with the bus terminal on your left and the train freight centre on your right. You can also walk under the bus terminal. If you keep walking under the bus terminal you’ll reach the Bybanen station and the entrance to the shopping mall. If you keep following this road you’ll cross the Bybanen tracks before reaching an alternative entrance to the shopping mall. There’s also a taxi rank here. Walk to the right (the road is called Vincens Lunge Gate - how fitting!), you’ll walk under a building, and then take the next left. Now the Bybanen tracks will be on your right. You will soon see..

Nonneseter Monastery

Nonneseter Monastery is the monastery we have mentioned a couple times as a major landowner along the lake. Here is one of two remaining parts of the monastery, dating to the 13th century. Originally the monastery sat on the strait that separated Lille & Store Lungegårdsvannet (it’s hard to imagine water being here today) – the street we are on is called Kaigaten, or quay street, and we’ve just walked on Lungegårdskaien (Lungegård Quay, between Amalie Skram VGS and the Bus Terminal) and Vincens Lunge gate – now we understand the history and the links between these place names!

It’s believed the Nonneseter Monastery was created as a Benedictine Monastery for women around 1150. It’s not known how the establishment of the monastery was funded, but in the royal gift letter on the transfer of Nonneseter to Vincens Lunge in 1528, the monastery states that it was “founded by advanced kings and queens”. It is likely that it was a royal foundation, probably from King Øystein’s reign. At the beginning of the 1300s, Nonneseter had 35 nuns – a high number internationally. Only 7% of England’s female monasteries had more than 30 nuns. Nonneseter was the largest and richest monastery and richer than many male monasteries. However, by the time of the Reformation in the 16th century, the income had declined by over 70%.

After the Black Death in 1349, the fortunes of Nonneseter declined rapidly, and the monastery was likely dissolved by King Christian I of Denmark/Norway (1450-1481). The property was given to Vincens Lunge in 1528 by King Fredrik I of Denmark, and the monastery was greatly dilapidated by that time. Lunge converted it into a private residence. His property stood there until 1891, when a fire ravaged the area. The tower foot and chapel, which are probably from 1250, are all that remains today.

In 2019, as part of Bergen’s 950th birthday celebrations in 2020, a digital render of Nonneseter Monastery was released, allowing you to explore what the monastery would’ve looked like online.

You can find this here: https://www.grind.no/midthordland/bergen/nonneseter

The image on the previous page is from a prospect of Bergen in 1740. It shows Nonneseter Monastery sitting between the two lakes (Store to the north and Lille to the south) and the straight that separates them. You can see the road Kaigaten with the houses on it.

You’ll be walking along this road with the bus terminal on your left and the train freight centre on your right. You can also walk under the bus terminal. If you keep walking under the bus terminal you’ll reach the Bybanen station and the entrance to the shopping mall. If you keep following this road you’ll cross the Bybanen tracks before reaching an alternative entrance to the shopping mall. There’s also a taxi rank here. Walk to the right (the road is called Vincens Lunge Gate - how fitting!), you’ll walk under a building, and then take the next left. Now the Bybanen tracks will be on your right. You will soon see..

Bergen Train Station

To your right will be the large granite building that is the Bergen Train Station. The station was opened in 1913, four years after the Bergen Line opened between Bergen and Oslo.

End of the walk! To get to Stadsporten, where we began the walk: Turn right at the train station and keep walking along Strømgaten. When you reach the next major road, Kong Oscars Gate, turn right. You’ll be at Stadporten. To get to Lille Lungegårdsvannet, cross the street over Strømgaten and enter the park to your left. You’ll see Lille Lungegårdsvannet almost immediately. To get to the city centre, keep walking along Kaigaten. You’ll pass the park on your left, cross Olav Kyrre’s Gate, and then be on the main square, Torgallmenningen, within minutes. Turn right at Torgallmenningen to get back to Bryggen. This is the end of the walk! I hope you enjoyed it. Email me your feedback at hello@ilovebergen.net If you’ve taken photos, tag ILoveBergen on social media using one of our social media handles or the hashtag #ilovebergen

Resources

I am not a historian and don’t claim to be. I am a local guide in Bergen who learns everything by reading, and that’s just what I did with this walk. There is much more historical depth to each place for those who want to venture out and learn more. What is important for me, as a guide, is to collect resources and build a story. Some of the resources I use are:

Norwegian Wikipedia. So much more detailed than the English website

Bergen byleksicon (https://www.bergenbyarkiv.no/bergenbyleksikon/) – a kind of Wikipedia but specifically for Bergen

Bergen ByArkiv has done a special in-depth look at Årstad, publishing a wealth of articles about the factories, old schools, hospital, and way of life here throughout history. You can explore their Årstad content here:
https://www.bergenbyarkiv.no/aarstad/

“Bergen Guide & Handbook” by Per Jonas Nordhagen. A wealth of information

“Bergen’s Wooden Architecture” by Trond Indahl

“Bergen Streets Broad and Narrow” by Anette Friis Pedersen

Bethany Hospital: http://www.betanien.no/om-stiftelsen/Pages/historie.aspx

Kalfaret house prices: https://proaktiv.no/bolig-til-salgs/hordaland/bergen/tomannsbolig/74160080

Kalfarlien 5 drama: https://www.ba.no/nyheter/en-dannet-byggekrangel/s/1-41-7157215

 https://www.grind.no/midthordland/bergen/nonneseter